First poems...pantoums!

Here are a first few poems written this week during our spring Art Connects Us residency with poet Verandah Porche. These are pantoums, a poetic form originating in Malaysia. On Tuesday night, 24 area residents of all ages came to the Cook Library to hear Verandah read her captivating poems and to write one of their own. Leaving aside a few outliers, a common theme emerged in many of the poems. It really has been a very long cold winter. Here are three: Verandah Porche Pantoum Workshop Cook Memorial Library 03/25/14

Discontent

By Laura Campbell, age 48

Now is the winter of our discontent Ragged boots shuffle restlessly on chair rungs Restless for bare feet again Soft air nudging, urging

Ragged boots shuffle restlessly on chair rungs Unendurable, longing for escape Soft air nudging, urging Awaken, release, run!

Unendurable, longing for escape Shifting toward the distant glorious summer Awaken, release, run! Too far, it seems, to ever reach

Shifting toward the distant glorious summer Longing stirring, forgetting where we are Too far, it seems, to ever reach Fast asleep, under the char, dreaming

Longing stirring, forgetting where we are Restless for bare feet again Fast asleep, under the char, dreaming Now is the winter of our discontent

 

Verandah Porche Pantoum Workshop Cook Memorial Library 03/25/14

Looking Beyond

By Sandy Trask, age 12

Sliver branches, glow in the light Doors open the hinges of possibility I sit by the fire-place Looking beyond

Doors open the hinges of possibility Molecules fly before my eyes Looking beyond Books untouched for centuries

Molecules fly before my eyes Paintings of the future Books untouched for centuries Truth under-lies

Paintings of the future Water flowing like dreams Truth under-lies Peace

Water flowing like dreams I sit by the fire-place Peace Sliver branches, glow in the light

Pantoum Verandah Porche’s workshop, 3/25/14 Kate Thompson

The ice stays stuck on the roof just like a month ago. You’d think the sun might melt it but it’s frozen in shape

just like a month ago. On Tuesday it started to curl down, but now it’s frozen in shape again - over the eaves, like a helmet.

On Tuesday it started to curl down, when it actually got up to 36 - over the eaves, like a helmet - but only for three hours.

When it actually got up to 36 some of us unbuttoned our coats... but only for three hours. What a joke.

Some of us unbuttoned our coats. You’d think the sun might melt things. What a joke. The ice stays stuck on the roof.

 

NEFA_black_RGB_small_0ACT is able to bring this talented, experienced, dedicated and joyful teacher and writer to Carroll County with help from many: The Verandah Porche residency is supported by generous sponsors BEAM Construction Associates, Inc. and Cooper Cargill Chant, the K. A. Brett School, the Tamworth PTA, the Tamworth Foundation, UUFES, and Yeoman's Fund for the Arts, and is funded in part by the New England States Touring program of the New England Foundation for the Arts, made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts Regional Touring Program and the six New England state arts agencies. Media sponsors are The Conway Daily Sun, 93.5 WMWV and Magic 104FM. You can support it, too! Help us continue to program school and community-wide artist residencies by donating below.

[art-donation id="1301"]

 

 

Poet Verandah Porche is ACT’s spring Art Connects Us artist-in-residence

verandahredwoodTo warm us up for National Poetry Month in April, Arts Council of Tamworth (ACT) is delighted to bring poet, mentor and scribe Verandah Porche to Tamworth as our spring Art Connects Us artist-in-residence. Community members of all ages will have several opportunities to play with words with Verandah, to learn from her, and to hear her poetry. You won’t be able to look at words in the same way once you’ve looked at them with Verandah. Verandah’s week will begin on Sunday, March 23, at 10:00 AM. She will lead a Poetry Service at the United Universalist Fellowship of the Eastern Slopes in Tamworth that will include poems, music, and the talk, “Finding the Verse in Conversation.” On Tuesday, March 25, at 7:00 PM at the Cook Library in Tamworth, Verandah will offer a Poetry Reading and Pantoum Workshop. All you Harry Potter fans out there: according to The New Yorker and Short List, Daniel Radcliffe is known to pen pantoums of an evening. Why? Because they’re really fun to write. This event is free; donations in support of ACT’s artist residencies in school and community are always welcome. On Wednesday, March 26 at 3:45 PM at the K. A. Brett School in Tamworth, Verandah will offer a professional development workshop for teachers, “Picturing Words: Teaching Descriptive Writing Through Poetry." Verandah will be in residency at the Brett School from March 24-28. Homeschoolers who would like to participate can call 323-7271 for the schedule. The public is welcome to attend the Community Poetry Sharing at Brett at 2:00 PM on Friday, March 28. “For forty years, based on a farm in Vermont,” Verandah says, “I’ve made a living stringing words together. I wanted my life to be a poem.” In addition to writing poetry that grows out of her own experience, Verandah is a muse for hire, creating original poetry that celebrates the moments and milestones in the lives of friends, neighbors, strangers and organizations. She has also developed a practice to create, preserve, and share personal literature with those who need a writing partner. She listens, probes, and records the told poetry or shared narrative of a diverse community. Verandah has created these collaborative writing projects in literacy and crisis centers, hospitals, factories, nursing homes, senior centers, a 200-year-old Vermont tavern, and an urban working-class neighborhood. Verandah also offers unique poetry workshops and residencies for students of all ages—elementary to Elderhostel—as she will do here. Her performances are lively and interactive, featuring Verandah’s work, poetic forms she’s invented or adapted, wordplay and whimsy. Visit verandahporche.com to read some of Verandah’s poems and to watch a wonderful video demonstrating her writing partnership work.

NEFA_black_RGB_small_0ACT is able to bring this talented, experienced, dedicated and joyful teacher and writer to Carroll County with help from many: The Verandah Porche residency is supported by generous sponsors BEAM Construction Associates, Inc. and Cooper Cargill Chant, the K. A. Brett School, the Tamworth PTA, the Tamworth Foundation, UUFES, and Yeoman's Fund for the Arts, and is funded in part by the New England States Touring program of the New England Foundation for the Arts, made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts Regional Touring Program and the six New England state arts agencies. Media sponsors are The Conway Daily Sun, 93.5 WMWV and Magic 104FM. You can support it, too! Help us continue to program school and community-wide artist residencies by donating below.

[art-donation id="1301"]

Poetry Walk Fundraiser at The Remick Museum

Poetry-RockThe Remick Country Doctor Museum & Farm is excited to partner with Richard and Marion Posner to create a Poetry Walk along our Binsack Trail. Join us Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013 (appropriately the 449th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s birth) from 5:00 to 6:30 PM to learn about our newest venture. An already beautiful stroll through a typically gorgeous New Hampshire country landscape will be transformed into a passage of words, emotions and geologic time as you experience Richard’s poem: The Tamworth Path of History, engraved on glacier-strewn granite boulders.

In Posner’s own words:

The Remick Country Doctor Museum and Farm is surrounded by and inundated with Nature’s beauty. Adjoining Tamworth, a few miles from the Remick Farm, there is wilderness and a National Forest. Mount Chocorua looms above, and the encircling woods and the glacial erratic boulders strewn over the fields are constant reminders of the history of the land.

So what can poetry contribute to such a beautiful place? I propose that a poem strung along the existing Joe Binsack Trail can provide a series of pauses and signposts for contemplation, a way of slowing down a walk and assisting a reader in drinking in and savoring the experience. Using existing boulders on the land, some in situ and some relocated, the work will be all but invisible from a distance but will add its quiet voice to a walker’s dialogue with the landscape.

Carved onto 23 rocks, some with only one word on them, a story will unfold along the path from Great Hill, around through the pastures to pass by the farm buildings and the house, and across the road to end at the river. The tale is a grand one, told in just 278 words: the history of the universe, this world, and of Tamworth itself.

Words carved on rocks are not casual conversation; they are intended to offer an underpinning progress and structure to the reader’s own thoughts. With a sense of stark wonder, we pass from the primeval universe to our planet, through the times of contraction and growth, of glaciers and regeneration, to the peopling of the land by successive waves of indigenous Americans, European settlers and later immigrants, to the established town we inhabit now, with its rich history, diverse population and manifold opportunities, and into the future. The poem will offer a long perspective to complement a visit to the museum.

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Poetry-Walk-LogoThe Remick Museum and Farm’s mission is to educate a broad and diverse public to the value and significance of the medical practice and agricultural way of life of the country doctor and to preserve and interpret the Remick property and collections for the benefit of the public.

The Museum is located at 58 Cleveland Hill Road, Tamworth, NH. Please call (603) 323-7591 for more information or look us up on our website: www.remickmuseum.org.

Poem for April 1: Mud Season

Mud Season The wide land remains, Released and rearranged, Embraced, glazed by mud Eternal and brown as photographs In village archives of booted children Clutching metal pails before a one-room school, Bare sepia hills showing the long walk home.

We, too, are rearranged, Unable to escape water’s deep courses, This annual reckoning. While trails are closed, we improvise, Seek our footing on the road’s verge. Astonished by Earth’s abundance, We work our way toward spring.

Jean Knox Sandwich and Dorchester MA